Health

Singapore Noodles (Paleo, Whole30) – Nom Nom Paleo®


My paleo, Whole30, and gluten-free Singapore Noodles recipe is a healthier twist on the popular Hong Kong rice noodle dish. My nomtastic version makes a few key substitutions that cuts out lots of carbs while packing on the protein, veggies, and flavor!

A closeup of paleo, Whole30 Singapore Noodles with shrimp on top.

Sneak peek recipe from our cookbook Nom Nom Paleo: Let’s Go!

I’m so excited to share this fantastic “noodle” recipe from our new cookbook, Nom Nom Paleo: Let’s Go!  Like our first two recipe books, this one’s a labor of love that was developed, tested, photographed, and designed in our home by me and Henry—but unlike our other books, this one was written during the pandemic, so its recipes truly reflect the dishes that bring me comfort and joy in challenging times. For me, that means paleo-fying dishes that I loved growing up—like these tasty Singapore Noodles!

Two hands holding out a copy of the Nom Nom Paleo: Let's Go! cookbook by Michelle Tam and Henry Fong

What are Singapore Noodles?

Despite their name, Singapore Noodles aren’t from Singapore. This dish actually originated in Hong Kong, where restaurant chefs were inspired by Singapore’s Indian-Chinese fusion cuisine! The classic preparation of Singapore Noodles involves quickly stir-frying rice vermicelli noodles (thin rice noodles) together with julienned vegetables, pork, shrimp, and scrambled eggs, all seasoned with curry powder to lend the dish a punch of heat and a distinctive yellow hue. My paleo-friendly version makes a few key substitutions, but otherwise hews closely to the formula that made the original dish a global hit.

An overhead shot of a bowl of paleo and Whole30 Singapore noodles, topped with shrimp and sliced scallions.

How do you get this dish on the table faster?

This dish can be on the table in about 30 minutes if you prep all your ingredients ahead of time. I normally use precooked spaghetti squash and leftover Paleo Char Siu from the fridge. Just measure everything out in advance so that you’re ready to throw everything into a skillet or wok; that way, you’ll make quick work of this dish!

Ingredients

  • Cooked Spaghetti Squash: I use cooked spaghetti squash as the replacement for rice stick noodles. This low carb faux noodle absorbs the seasoning really well. Besides, you can quickly cook up spaghetti squash in the Instant Pot or microwave.
  • Paleo Char Siu: This is the perfect recipe to use up your leftover Paleo Char Siu! If you don’t have any Chinese roast pork on hand, you can substitute thinly sliced ham, cooked pork tenderloin, or cooked chicken.
  • Large prawns: Prawns are a traditional protein in Singapore noodles, but you can leave ’em out if you have an allergy or don’t like shrimp.
  • Arrowroot powder: I use this to coat the shrimp before frying them—it makes them a little crispy and the starch helps thicken the sauce a little.
  • Eggs: I told you this recipe is packed with protein!
  • Vegetables (red bell pepper, carrot, and onion): Cut these into thin matchsticks or thin strips so they’ll cook quickly! Feel free to change up the vegetables—some great alternatives include snow peas, julienned celery, or thinly sliced cabbage.
  • Avocado oil: My preferred high temperature paleo-friendly cooking oil. It’s a much better alternative to vegetable oil.
  • Coconut aminos: I use a combination of coconut aminos and Red Boat fish sauce to replicate the taste of soy sauce and oyster sauce.
  • Red Boat fish sauce: Adds extra umami and salt!
  • Madras curry powder: My favorite Madras curry powder is from Oaktown Spice Co. Some brands include salt, so take that into account when you’re making the sauce for this dish!
  • Diamond Crystal kosher salt
  • Toasted sesame oil: Adds a subtle nuttiness to the dish—but don’t sweat it if you don’t have any.
  • Scallions or green onions: Adds a colorful and fresh-tasting garnish before serving.

Method:

Gather spaghetti squash and Paleo Char Siu

Cook up some spaghetti squash in the Instant Pot or microwave and slice up some Paleo Char Siu into matchsticks. 

A hand is holding a blue plate with cooked and shredded spaghetti squash

Season the shrimp

In a medium bowl, combine the shrimp, arrowroot powder, and salt. Mix well and set aside.

A person in a red apron is adding a spoonful of salt to a bowl of raw shrimp

Make the sauce

In a small bowl, combine the coconut aminos, fish sauce, and curry powder. Whisk it all together and set the sauce mixture aside.

A person in a red apron is whisking the sauce for Singapore noodles in a small clear bowl

Scramble some eggs

In a measuring cup or bowl, whisk the eggs together with the remaining teaspoon of fish sauce. 

Whisking raw eggs in a clear liquid measuring cup

Heat a large cast-iron or non-stick skillet over medium heat. Once it’s hot, swirl in 1 tablespoon of oil. Pour the eggs into the pan and cook, stirring, until set. 

Pouring whisked eggs from a liquid measuring cup into a hot skillet

Break the scrambled eggs into small pieces and transfer them to a plate. Wipe the skillet clean.

An overhead shot of a blue and white plate topped with scrambled eggs

Cook the shrimp, vegetables, and Char Siu

Increase the heat to medium-high. Once it’s hot, add 1 tablespoon of oil to the now-empty pan. Toss in the shrimp. Cook, stirring frequently, for about 30 seconds. 

Shrimp being sautéed in a enameled cast iron skillet

Next, toss in the bell pepper, carrot, onion, char siu and the remaining curry powder. 

Someone adding a spoonful of curry powder to a skillet filled with matchstick vegetables, shrimp, and Char Siu

Cook, stirring frequently, for about 2 to 3 minutes or until the meat is heated through and the vegetables are tender-crisp. Transfer the contents of the pan to a large plate.

A plate topped with the meat and vegetables for paleo and Whole30 Singapore noodles

Sauté the spaghetti squash “noodles”

Wipe the skillet clean, and add the remaining oil. Toss in the spaghetti squash. Saute for 1 to 2 minutes to cook off some of the moisture from the “noodles.”

Transferring a plate of cooked spaghetti squash to an empty skillet.

Give the sauce one more stir and pour it into the pan with the “noodles.” Stir to distribute the sauce evenly.

A pair of metal tongs is stirring spaghetti squash in an enameled cast iron skillet.

Add the protein and veggies

Add the cooked vegetables, char siu, and reserved eggs. Stir well to combine. Taste for seasoning and adjust if needed. 

Adding the reserved cooked shrimp, vegetables, and scrambled eggs to the skillet with seasoned spaghetti squash

Stir in ½ teaspoon of toasted sesame oil.  Plate the noodles with a pair of tongs…

A pair of tongs is adding a shrimp to a bowl of paleo and whole30 Singapore Noodles.

…and garnish with thinly sliced scallions before serving.

Adding sliced scallions to a bowl of paleo and Whole30 Singapore noodles

Enjoy!

A hand holding a bowl of paleo and Whole30 Singapore noodles.

Love this recipe? Buy our new cookbook, Nom Nom Paleo: Let’s Go! wherever books are sold!

Other Paleo Noodle recipes


Looking for more recipe ideas? Head on over to my Recipe Index. You’ll also find exclusive recipes on my iPhone and iPad app, and in my cookbooks, Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2013), Ready or Not! (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2017), and Nom Nom Paleo: Let’s Go! (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2022).


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An overhead shot of a bowl of paleo and Whole30 Singapore noodles, topped with shrimp and sliced scallions.

Print Recipe

Singapore Noodles (Paleo, Whole30)

This paleo, Whole30, and gluten-free Singapore noodles recipe is a healthier twist on a popular Hong Kong rice noodle dish! My nomtastic version makes a few key substitutions that cuts out lots of carbs while packing on the protein, veggies, and flavor!

Prep Time15 mins

Cook Time15 mins

Course: Dinner

Cuisine: Asian

Keyword: low carb, nom nom paleo, nomnompaleo, paleo, Whole30

Servings: 4

Calories: 527kcal

Instructions 

  • Cook up some spaghetti squash in the Instant Pot or microwave and slice up some Paleo Char Siu into matchsticks. 
  • In a medium bowl, combine the shrimp, arrowroot powder, and salt. Mix well and set aside.

  • Now, we’re going to make the sauce! In a small bowl, combine the coconut aminos, 2 teaspoons of fish sauce, and 2 teaspoons of curry powder. Whisk it all together and set the sauce aside.

  • In a measuring cup or bowl, whisk the eggs together with the remaining teaspoon of fish sauce.

  • Heat a large cast-iron or non-stick skillet over medium heat. Once it’s hot, swirl in 1 tablespoon of oil.

  • Pour the eggs into the pan and cook, stirring, until set. Break the eggs into small pieces and transfer them to a plate. Wipe the skillet clean.

  • Increase the heat to medium-high. Once it’s hot, add 1 tablespoon of oil to the now-empty pan. Toss in the shrimp. Cook, stirring frequently, for about 30 seconds.

  • Next, toss in the bell pepper, carrot, onion, Paleo Char Siu and the remaining 2 teaspoons of curry powder.

  • Cook, stirring frequently, for about 2 to 3 minutes or until the meat is heated through and the vegetables are tender-crisp. Transfer the contents of the pan to a large plate.

  • Wipe the skillet clean, and add the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil. Toss in the spaghetti squash. Saute for 1 to 2 minutes to cook off some of the moisture from the “noodles.”

  • Give the sauce one more stir and pour it in the pan. Stir to distribute the sauce evenly.

  • Add the vegetables, Char Siu, and reserved eggs. Stir well to combine. Taste for seasoning and adjust if needed.

  • Stir in ½ teaspoon of toasted sesame oil. Plate the noodles and garnish with 2 thinly sliced scallions before serving.

Notes

Love this recipe? It’s from our new cookbook, Nom Nom Paleo: Let’s Go! and you can buy it wherever books are sold!
This dish can get on the table in about 30 minutes if you prep all your ingredients ahead of time. I normally use precooked spaghetti squash and leftover Paleo Char Siu that I have stored in my refrigerator. If everything is measured out and ready to throw in the skillet or wok, the actual cooking time is short and you won’t accidentally burn anything because you’re busy chopping an ingredient!

Nutrition

Calories: 527kcal | Carbohydrates: 23g | Protein: 32g | Fat: 26g | Fiber: 5g

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