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The bottom line: More expensive toilet paper is not always better

Toilet papers were rated for softness, puncture resistance, ease of separation and disintegration time.

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Toilet papers were rated for softness, puncture resistance, ease of separation and disintegration time.

Not all toilet papers are created equal and some “long” rolls fall short, according to Consumer NZ.

The watchdog put toilet paper through its paces and found that a higher price doesn’t always mean a higher quality paper.

It also found the length of “long roll” papers could vary by more than 10 metres across brands.

EarthSmart 100% Recycled Toilet Paper finished on top in Consumer NZ’s testing, followed closely by Soft Touch Ultra Soft Toilet Tissue.

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But at 2.4 cents and 2.1c per metre respectively, the top-scoring rolls were not the most expensive on offer.

That title went to With Small Premium Tree Free TP, a bamboo fibre product which cost 5.4c per metre.

Value Strong and Soft Toilet Tissue finished last and was also the cheapest paper tested, at 1.3c per metre.

Consumer NZ put toilet paper to the test and found that a higher price doesn’t always equal higher quality.

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Consumer NZ put toilet paper to the test and found that a higher price doesn’t always equal higher quality.

However, its overall score was still respectable for the cost, Consumer NZ said.

Testing was conducted by an independent laboratory and rated each roll for softness, puncture resistance, ease of separation and disintegration time.

“The toilet papers which came out [in the] middle of the pack will set you back more than the top performers,” Consumer NZ test manager Paul Smith​ said.

However, people had different priorities when it came to toilet paper.

“For some, the length of the roll matters the most; for others the softness of the paper is the top concern. Or it could come down to the product’s price,” Smith said.

Consumer measured the length of each toilet roll and, while those findings did not factor into the overall scoring, found significant variation in the length of “long” rolls.

“Of the ‘long’ rolls we measured, one was just over 28 metres and another was just under 40m. That’s a big difference,” Smith said.

“[But] all the papers we tested stand up well to the job in hand – we are not worried about consumers getting a bum deal.”

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